Ryan's Place

Sunday, January 01, 2006

Seattle Beat by Green Bay, Alexander Sets TD Record & Captures Rushing Title



From NFL.com:

If this game were the last of Brett Favre's career, at least he went down slinging.

And, in his first losing season with the Green Bay Packers, at least he went out a winner as they beat the playoff-bound Seattle Seahawks 23-17.

"If this were to be his last game, then I'm really glad I was here," said Seahawks coach Mike Holmgren, Favre's former coach in Green Bay. "He has nothing to prove to anybody."

Favre threw his first touchdown pass in the past five games, but the game still featured a few more reminders of why Favre is considering retirement. He was intercepted again, his career-worst 29th of the season, and played the end of the game with a shoulder injury.

And he was upstaged for a half by Seahawks running back Shaun Alexander, who set an NFL record for touchdowns in a season with 28 and surpassed the New York Giants' Tiki Barber for the NFL rushing crown.

Favre, 36, said in recent weeks he is unsure whether he will play next year. He did not speak to the media after the game, an unusual move for him.

Favre left the field waving to the crowd, surrounded by a swarm of photographers and others.

Packers coach Mike Sherman, whose own future with the team is in doubt, said he expects to visit Favre soon to "take a ride on his tractor" and talk about next season.

There is no timeline for Favre's decision, although he has had preliminary talks with Packers general manager Ted Thompson.

"Probably in the next month or so," Sherman said. "I'm not that sure."

The Seahawks, meanwhile, plan to spend the next month in the playoffs.

"Now our second season starts," Holmgren said. "Fortunately we have a first-round bye, so we can heal up a little bit and get ready to play in the playoffs."

Alexander scored his record touchdown on a 1-yard run in the second quarter.

He piled up 73 yards by halftime, enough to pass Barber for the league rushing lead.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home